• Institutional Memory and Cyclic Cashew Crises in Tanzania

    Institutional Memory and Cyclic Cashew Crises in Tanzania0

    It is nearly ‘half a year’ since I penned some suggestions on Resolving the Cyclic Cashew Crisis in Tanzania. The proposed solution of uprooting the root cause seemed impractical. Readers were left wondering ‘what’ – and even ‘who’ – is the root cause. As the crisis continues, I ought to clarify that the root cause is both

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  • From Ghettoizing to Gentrifying African Studies

    From Ghettoizing to Gentrifying African Studies0

    From time to time we are treated to a powerful critique of, or contentious debate on, African Studies. This time it has come from Haythem Guesmi’s viral article on ‘The Gentrification of African Studies.’ In a way, it is coming on the heels of Jean Allman’s  celebrated address on “#HerskovitsMustFall? A Meditation on Whiteness, African Studies, and the Unfinished Business of 1968.”

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  • Resolving the Cyclic Cashew Crisis in Tanzania

    Resolving the Cyclic Cashew Crisis in Tanzania0

    Tanzania has just witnessed a tale of the sacking of two Charles’. One, the Minister who was responsible for agriculture and, another, for industries. What has been dubbed ‘koroshow’ is behind this, not least because the cashew board has also been dissolved alongside other related reshuffles. Korosho is a Swahili word for cashew. For politicians from the opposition camp,

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  • Magufuli’s Three Years in Office: Confusion as a Strategy?

    Magufuli’s Three Years in Office: Confusion as a Strategy?0

    If you can’t convince ’em, confuse ’em: if you can’t confuse ’em, scare ’em- Unknown Author If you want to sum up President John Magufuli’s three years in office, then something that happened last week can give you a picture. The controversial Dar es Salaam Regional Commissioner, Paul Makonda, announced war on the LGBT community a week

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  • Angel Investors and Demons of Venture Capital

    Angel Investors and Demons of Venture Capital0

    “Plus Ça Change, Plus C’est La Même Chose” – Jean Baptiste Alphonse Karr The old Swahili adage, “vijana ni taifa la kesho” (youth are the nation of tomorrow), seems outdated. Even the use of the phrase, “Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Future”, is apparently waning. What appears to be trending now is Africa as “the young continent.” It is thus not surprising that

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  • Having Friends in Power

    Having Friends in Power0

    Why aren’t you writing about it, a former colleague asked. She/He was referring to my practice of analyzing political appointments in Tanzania. In this case, it was in reference to her/his appointment. Her/His appointment, like those of a couple of my other colleagues,  has left me contemplating about what does it mean to have friends in echelons of

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  • Peaceful Tanzania: Back to the Future?

    Peaceful Tanzania: Back to the Future?0

    “In this great future, you can’t forget your past” – Bob Marley We are told historians cannot predict the future. They can only review the past. And they do so to illuminate the present. So, here I am reading those who can unpack the present and peek at the future of my beloved country. ‘Tanzania: Everyone is scared’ reads

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  • Beyond Advocating for Change

    Beyond Advocating for Change0

    “Decades ago, as President of my country, I told Tanzanians that the choice before them was to change or be changed. I was wrong. There was no choice. They had to change, and would still BE changed” – Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Change is the only constant. A change is gonna come. The times they are a-changin’. These

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  • Can Being Bayesian Save Tanzanians From Internal Inconsistency?

    Can Being Bayesian Save Tanzanians From Internal Inconsistency?0

    I read with great interest Constantine Manda’s (@msisiri) response to my blog post on the recent results from the Pew Surveys. Thanks to the ABCs of Bayesian Analysis that I picked up from Casper Troskie at the University of Cape Town (UCT), I managed to follow the argument and model. And I agree that we need to be Bayesian. What

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  • The Majority of Tanzanians are Satisfied with the Way Democracy is Working in our Country But…

    The Majority of Tanzanians are Satisfied with the Way Democracy is Working in our Country But…0

    “Democracy is not a bottle of Coca-Cola which you can import” – Mwalimu Julius Nyerere I have been particularly annoyed with the ways some of our compatriots have been using the corporate Western media to portray the purported decay of democracy in Tanzania. “Upheaval in Kenyan, Ugandan politics as Tanzania cracks down,” one such outlet

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Africa has forgotten the women leaders of its independence struggle. Africa needs to do better by its women.. --@TamukaKagoro77 qz.com/africa/157428…