• Caster Semenya, and Fairness in Sport (and Life)

    Caster Semenya, and Fairness in Sport (and Life)0

    If we were to design athletic competition from scratch, how would we proceed? I think, given all the biases we’ve challenged or discarded since the first time athletic competition was tracked (sex, gender, race), we’d hope to find some way to match competitors in a way that created the spectacle required, and rewarded skill and

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  • Mandela Day and Sustainable Charity

    Mandela Day and Sustainable Charity0

    In November 2009, the United Nations General Assembly declared that 18 July should be commemorated as “Nelson Mandela International Day”, in recognition of his “struggle for democracy internationally and the promotion of a culture of peace”. It is unfortunately all too easy to imagine Mandela looking on in dismay at where we are in 2016,

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  • Democracy, my foot

    Democracy, my foot0

    Like many other Ugandans, whatever illusions I might have had about our being a “democracy” were quashed in February. But, every now and then I chance upon something that extols our democratic virtues. Government literature, especially. It’s rare to read a government report whose foreword or introduction does not include a reminder about how far

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  • Ungovernables from the subcontinent, busy in Berlin

    Ungovernables from the subcontinent, busy in Berlin0

    I returned Friday 6 May,  from a week in Berlin, which I can highly recommend for those of you who haven’t visited. While I don’t normally do the standard touristy stuff, there’s so much history in this city that I thought it well-worth the guided tours that our group went on. The traveling party consisted

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  • Zuma – manifestly unfit for purpose

    Zuma – manifestly unfit for purpose0

    Moral debates are not settled in courts. The law can be profoundly immoral, if it is written and practiced by those who want to defend immorality, or those who are not aware of what their moral responsibilities are. For one, it can defend things that are immoral (for example, by prohibiting gay marriage), and second,

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  • Humanity before religion

    Humanity before religion0

    Originally published in the Mail&Guradian  Religion matters as much today as it ever did. It matters to a slowly but steadily increasing proportion of the world’s population, even though it is in decline in Japan, the United States, Vietnam, Germany, France and the United Kingdom. Everywhere else, religious adherence is increasing, with Pew Research data

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  • South African news media: hopefully not dead, just resting

    South African news media: hopefully not dead, just resting0

    Fridays are the day when – if I happen to walk into a store that sells newspapers – I’ll often cast a wistful gaze at the stack of Mail & Guardian (M&G) papers delivered that morning, noting that my primary impulse would sooner be to straighten the stack rather than to buy a copy. This

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  • The (unbearable?) whiteness of #ZumaMustFall

    The (unbearable?) whiteness of #ZumaMustFall0

    It’s an undeniable fact that last month’s #ZumaMustFall march in Cape Town was overwhelmingly white. It’s also true that – as I said in my previous post – the “Zuma must fall” hashtag and related tweets have provided an opportunity for some folks to flaunt obviously racist sentiment. But neither of these features are good

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  • South Africa: Brief notes on a meltdown in confidence

    South Africa: Brief notes on a meltdown in confidence0

    In 2012, I asked “when should South Africans begin entertaining the possibility that we have an illegitimate government?” – and even though I certainly don’t claim this was a unique or original thought, I’d imagine many more South Africans would share this sentiment today than did then. Since that time, we’ve had Nkandla, al-Bashir, the

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  • Dianne Kohler Barnard, social media and proportional punishment

    Dianne Kohler Barnard, social media and proportional punishment0

    By Jacques Rousseau As anyone with more than a passing interest in South African politics would know, the Democratic Alliance (DA) Federal Executive on Friday confirmed the expulsion (which is under appeal) of Dianne Kohler Barnard (DKB) from the party, following her Facebook share of the following post:   It’s easy to see why so

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Paul Shalala ZNBC

We reporters in Zambia must start researching, we need to learn about health conditions. These fake stories we... fb.me/Qedv6Izh